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Press review

The Creation

“Insula Orchestra shows that it has come of age with a spring in its step. This symphonic genesis, far more than just seven days’ work, owes much to the leadership of Laurence Equilbey, whose intelligence serves music that is at once intimate and grandiose. With suppleness, sense of colour, dramaturgical sensibility, and precision, her conducting is more relaxed, and has gained in magnitude.”
Marie-Aude Roux, Le Monde, 16 March 2017
 
“The musicians of Insula orchestra, led by conductor Laurence Equilbey, underscore all the nuances in the score with a formal lightness of touch that only serves to magnify the work. Equilbey, in a state of grace, conducts weightlessly, discernibly illustrating the influence of Carl Philip Emmanuel Bach on Haydn’s writing.”
Jean-Rémi Barland, La Provence, 16 March 2017

 

Boxset accentus – the a cappella Recordings, Naïve

“We probably owe to Laurence Equilbey, the founder of the accentus choir in 1991, the act of (re)birth of the a cappella choral music in France. In a few decades, the undertaking choir master has not only filled a void but also created an increasing interest in the discography and especially revealed to the audience whole sections of Poulenc, Richard Strauss and Rachmaninov repertoire.”
Marie-Aude Roux, Le Monde, 09/12/2016

 

Night and dreams

“Insula Orchestra and Laurence Equilbey gave a very fine concert of music by Schubert, featuring a version of the Unfinished Symphony of a quality that one would like to hear more often.(…) The size of the main auditorium at the Arsenal in no way impaired the legibility of the immensely subtle interpretation led by Laurence Equilbey, absolutely on top of her game. The quality of the treatment, creating the impression that one was hearing the premiere of a piece that one yet felt one knew by heart, seems to definitively inter the controversy about the need, or otherwise, to play the nineteenth century repertory on period instruments.”
Pierre Degott, ResMusica, 07/11/2016

 

Travel and love

“Since a few years, Insula orchestra imposed itself as one of the best ensembles playing on period instruments. (…) The strings are playing in one voice, almost as the signature of Insula orchestra, since it is a constant in the playing of the ensemble. The conducting of Laurence Equilbey seems inhabited and allows a creativity in the instant”.
Florence Michel, ResMusica, 18/10/2016

 

Lucio Silla

” Not for nothing Laurence Equilbey refers to her proximity to Nikolaus Harnoncourt ( ” he was an alchemist ” ). She managed to unfold a wide array of colours from the historic instruments of the excellent Insula Orchestra and she demonstrates a true passion for music. The evening ends in a thunder of applause. This ” Lucio Silla ” could flourish in Vienna.”
Ernst Strobl, Salzburger Nachrichten

“Insula orchestra played Mozart’s intricate score with élan and sensitivity. The many sforzando and fortepiano markings were meticulously observed and there was admirable attention to orchestral detail. Period brass were excitingly raspy and the strings had a bright sonority which the excellent acoustics of the house displayed to the utmost.”
Jonathan Sutherland, Bachtrack

” The Insula orchestra under Laurence Equilbey also makes a stand. From the first bars, the brass grabs you, as do modeled accents in the higher strings.”
The Writing is on the Wall: “Lucio Silla” at Theater an der Wien by Anik LaChev

 

Barock +

“With a constant informed historical approach , the french conductor Laurence Equilbey conducts the excellent choir and the soloists in a high quality performance ”
Harald Budweg, FAZ Rhein-Main-Zeitung; 29/12/2015

“A french choir that celebrates a German victory : it is a symbol of friendship and understanding between people. Presentation of rare works.”
“Men from accentus choir in particular [...] give real pleasure with their vigorous voices and a perfect German pronunciation”
“The HR-Sinfonieorchester was inspired by a fine sound, under the direction of the guest conductor”
Michael Dellith, Frankfurter Neue Presse, 19/12/2015